Program Overview--Tentative Schedule

Wednesday, June 5

5:00 pm - 7:00 pm - Registration and Welcome Wine-and-Cheese Reception at the Ward Museum (included in conference registration)


Thursday, June 6

8:30 am - 9:00 am - Registration and Breakfast

9:00 am - 9:45 am - Keynote address, “Depleting the Immense Protein Factory that was Chesapeake Bay,” Victor Kennedy

Dr. Victor Kennedy is professor emeritus at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory and previously taught and performed research at Horn Point Laboratory. He is the author of Shifting Baselines in the Chesapeake Bay (JHU Press, 2018) and numerous articles in scientific journals. With Dr. Willem Roosenburg, he co-edited Ecology and Conservation of the Diamond-backed Terrapin (JHU Press, 2018).

10:00 am - 11:15 am - Concurrent sessions

Discussion: Building Socio-ecological Resilience to Climate Change through Multi-Stakeholder Collaborations

Moderator: Michael Paolisso, University of Maryland College Park

Discussants:

  • Sasha Land Maryland, Department of Natural Resources

  • Jennifer Raulin, Maryland Department of Natural Resources

  • Jennifer Dindinger, Maryland Sea Grant Extension

  • Andrew Webster, Salisbury University

  • Elizabeth Van Dolah, University of Maryland College Park

  Presentations: Servitude and Race in the Broader Chesapeake

  • “Attended with many Evils”: A Case of Manumission in Colonial Maryland

    Beatriz Hardy, Salisbury University        

  • A Madman's Deed -- A Maniac's Hand":  Gender and Justice in Three Maryland Lynchings

    Christine Arnold-Lourie, College of Southern Maryland              

  •  The Chesapeake in Pennsylvania: Unfree Labor and Settlement in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, 1780-1830

    Nathaniel Conley, University of Arkansas              

11:30 am - 12:45 pm - Concurrent sessions

Presentations: Maritime and Material Culture

  • "The Celebrated Wreckers": B & J Baker & Company of Norfolk

    Anna Holloway, Independent Scholar         

  •  Furnishing the Chesapeake: Crafting Identities in a Revolutionary World

    Michelle Fitzgerald, Homewood Museum, Johns Hopkins University

  •  A Case for Character: Leadership Lessons Learned from a 19th-century Eastern Shore Schooner Captain

    Paul Ewell, Virginia Wesleyan University/Eastern Shore Watermen's Museum  

  •  Wooden boat builders in Eastern Shore society, 1840-2000

    Pete Lesher, Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum             

 Presentations: Transdisciplinary Research Approaches in Chesapeake Bay

Presenters are all from the University on Maryland Center for Environmental Science - Integration and Application Network

  • Combining narratives and visuals to communicate transdisciplinary research

    William C. Dennison

  • Using conceptual diagrams as synthesis tools for transdisciplinary science

    Emily Nastase

  • Community based monitoring contributes local data to managing the Chesapeake Bay

    Caroline Donovan

  • Co-designing a citizen science program for monitoring submerged aquatic vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay

    Suzanne Spitzer

  • Incorporating transdisciplinary indicators into the Chesapeake Bay report card

    Heath Kelsey

  • Stakeholder perceptions on the benefits and limitations of a transdisciplinary report card for the Chesapeake Bay

    Vanessa Vargas-Nguyen

1:00 - 1:45 pm - Lunch in the GAC Assembly Hall (included in conference registration)

1:45 pm - 2:30 pm - “A Celebration of Chesapeake Science” poster session

2:45 pm - 4:00 pm - Concurrent sessions

Presentations: Environment, Policy, and Economy

  • The Fall Line: Engine Room of the Chesapeake

Gregory Hargreaves, University of Delaware      

  • A Watershed Moment: Science, Politics, Activism, and the Creation of the First Chesapeake Bay Agreement, 1973 - 1983

Andrew Ramey, Carnegie Mellon University              

  • The Industrial Bay: Oyster Dredging and the Redefinition of an Environmental Space

Austin Kibler, Research Librarian               

  • On the Border of the Tropics: Toward a Historical Synthesis of the Chesapeake Bay's Ecological Crisis

Lynn Nelson, Middle Tennessee State University             

Presentations: Chesapeake and Delmarva Culture 

  •  The Legacy of the 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival Program, "Water Ways:  Mid-Atlantic Maritime Communities"

Betty Belanus, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage              

  •  The Archival Document and the National Wildlife Refuge: A Settler's Meditation on Colonialism in Delmarva

Ryan Koons, Maryland Tradition          

  •  The Farm Security Administration's Photographs of Roma on the Maryland Eastern Shore

James Deutsch, Smithsonian Institution              

4:00 pm - 6:00 pm - Screening of Documentaries (optional, free)

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm - Crab feast (optional, additional charge, additional guests welcome)


Friday, June 7

Optional field trips (at an additional charge) to explore aspects of the Chesapeake and Delmarva. Tentatively scheduled field trips (by no means finalized!):

Behind the Scenes at the Horn Point Laboratory and Oyster Hatchery

Learn about the cutting edge research of the University of Maryland Center of Environmental Science (UMCES) faculty and graduate students that they conduct in the Chesapeake Bay. Located just outside of Cambridge, Maryland, UMCES researchers are working on critical questions of oyster restoration, disruptions to food chains, the loss of submerged aquatic vegetation that is so critical for the shellfish industry in the Bay, as well as many other important environmental quality indicators.  Following the tour of the UMCES facility, we will enjoy a dockside lunch at a locally-owned restaurant in Cambridge. This tour will depart Salisbury at 9:00 am, returning by 3:00 pm.  The cost is $10/person, lunch not included.

Following Harriet Tubman: Creating the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitors Center

Visit the new Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Park.  Tour will include the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center, portions of the surrounding Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, and an opportunity to interact with the Park’s education director.  Harriet Tubman was born into slavery and grew up near this site in southern Dorchester County, Maryland.  After escaping slavery as a young woman, she returned to area multiple times to help lead approximately 70 family members and friends to freedom.  The site and Visitor’s Center operate under the National Park Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service and Maryland State Parks. Approximately 4 hours.  Box lunches provided. Cost $30/person, lunch included.

Smith Island: A Threatened Island, a Threatened Way of Life (wear long sleeves and long pants, bugs will be hungry)

Smith Island is one of the Chesapeake's most famous communities - this island, never connected to the mainland by a bridge, has been the home of watermen and women since the 17th century. The story of Smith Island is, in many ways, the story of the Chesapeake over the past four hundred years. This tour will depart Salisbury at 9:00 am, returning by 4:00 pm.  We will drive to Crisfield and take a ferry to the island, where we will visit the two communities of Tylerton and Ewell, including visits to the Smith Island Cultural Center, the crab-picking cooperative, conversations with residents, and lunch at Drum Point Market (on your own), which boasts the best crab cake sandwiches to be had anywhere, as well as the official Maryland state dessert - Smith Island Cakes. Cost $50/person, lunch not included. Plan to wear long pants and long sleeves, as the insect population will be flourishing.

Both conference registrants and their guests may participate in the field trips. Trips will leave at about 9 a.m. with pickups at both the Hampton Inn in Fruitland and the Guerrieri Academic Commons at SU.